Photography Tips: Full Frame & Crop Sensor Cameras

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What is the difference between Full Frame & Crop Sensor? Full Frame or Crop Sensor – which is better? What is the best sensor size? These questions are asked a lot and it can be very confusing….

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Mike Browne says:

Hi Everyone

Full frame and Crop sensor cameras – there are benefits to both – but which
is right for you? I’m not going into the maths of this because many have
done it beautifully already. Instead I’m going to take some images on each
and explain the costs and payoffs of each.

I’m sorry it’s been a few weeks since the last video – I’ve been working
overseas and haven’t had time (or fast enough connection) to get one out to
you…

Best wishes

Mike

Polaventris says:

I switched from Nikon D3100 to second hand Canon 5D (the original one) and
I couldn’t be more happy with the swap. Image quality on the 5D is way
better than the D3100 even if it is much older camera. But to be honest, I
love pixel peeping…

Tim Hill says:

Photography Tips: *Full Frame & Crop Sensor Cameras*

What is the difference between Full Frame & Crop Sensor? Full Frame or Crop
Sensor – which is better? What is the best sensor size? These questions are
asked a lot and it can be very confusing.

Both sensor sizes have benefits and potential ‘costs’ attached to them. A
full frame has less depth of filed than a crop – so for blurry background
portraits a FF will be better, but for big depth of field maybe a crop
sensor camera. But that will have less resolution… and so it goes on.

So I’ve distilled it down to the basics to explain the advantages and
dis-advantages of both to help you chose which works best for you.

Mike Browne

Thank you very much for the video +Mike Browne ;)

Sabrina Hill says:

From a pro that has been doing this job for nearly 20 years, I watch your
videos less for the information I may learn, but rather your pleasant
disposition and different take on photography techniques and inspiration.
Keep up the great work. ^^

Iamdonald duck says:

larger sensor size does not actually (create) shallower DOF — shallow DOF
is (created) only by ( #1 focal length) ( #2 aperture) ( #3 subject
foreground/background distance) – so crop vs FF the eq:focal length change
is what is being seen

EverythingTech says:

Thanks Mike and Lorna. We had a major debate about this, in one of your
previous videos. It’s like you said, it’s down to the individual. You can
have a £3500 camera and lens and still take rubbish photos. A great
photographer can take amazing photos with a barbie camera. For me, the most
difficult thing is composition. Buying an expensive full frame camera
cannot fix that
Thanks for the video guys

BadMouseProductions says:

One of the little pros that I like about Full Frame is I know exactly what
length I’m going to get out of the lens, 50mm is 50mm and not 80mm. And
thats also another Pro, I can get wider! :D

Michael Didomenico says:

I own the Canon 70D and I use it for great video’s and as my travel camera.
I use FF Canon lens because I am looking into moving up to the Canon 6D
because it has a tremendous Low-Light record, and I love low light right
now.

Mike C says:

Hi Everyone

Full frame and Crop sensor cameras – there are benefits to both – but which
is right for you? I’m not going into the maths of this because many have
done it beautifully already. Instead I’m going to take some images on each
and explain the costs and payoffs of each.

I’m sorry it’s been a few weeks since the last video – I’ve been working
overseas and haven’t had time (or fast enough connection) to get one out to
you…

Best wishes

Mike

Linda Medhurst says:

Hi Everyone

Full frame and Crop sensor cameras – there are benefits to both – but which
is right for you? I’m not going into the maths of this because many have
done it beautifully already. Instead I’m going to take some images on each
and explain the costs and payoffs of each.

I’m sorry it’s been a few weeks since the last video – I’ve been working
overseas and haven’t had time (or fast enough connection) to get one out to
you…

Best wishes

Mike

Norbert Rakosi says:

Another great video from +Mike Browne . Thanks for sharing

Jim Myers says:

Mike thank you for the insight, is there a newer crop sensor that would be
a better buy than a used d300?

akastonefaceddog says:

I think less is more so I tend to agree. Nicely done. Hope you enjoyed your
cakes!

Johnny says:

I think talking about resolution may be confusing. A Full Frame sensor does
not necessarily have more pixels than a Crop Sensor, for instance both the
Canon 6D (FF) and the Canon 7D (Crop) have the same amount of pixels. But
the 6D is a better performer because the same number of pixels over a
larger sensor area means larger “photo sites”. Larger photo sites are able
to collect more light and therefore the sensor will perform better (with
less noise) in low light conditions. Having said that, in good light
conditions most sensors these days should be able to deliver good results
regardless of size and number of pixels.

Jim Myers says:

Thanks for the reply Mike and keep up the great work

OlenVellu says:

EOS M with the APS-C sensor is the best choise for me. I use it now with a
22mm f/2.0 pancake lens and together they are a perfect package! Smaller
size is also +.

Yves Hetu says:

It is always a pleasure to watch your videos. Thank you !

David Croft says:

Once again a great tutorial. Great camera work from Lorna.

Scott Micale says:

Great video +Mike Browne Very good explanations of these two camera body
options.

Roy UK says:

Welcome back ….. Good to see you again

Jakub Kurzawa says:

Mike, you compared F2.8 on a FF camera to a F5.6 on a DX. Results would not
be so far off in depth of field if you would compare the same lens on these
two cameras at the same focal length and f number.

Hert Niks says:

Thats an inaccurate test. You shouldve had the aperture at 3.5 on the
fullframe too. 

1980Cog says:

Its funny Ive shot with a wide range of cropped sensor cameras and now use
a full frame. The full frame one is actually probably one of my least
favourite out of them. I know thats probably more to do with the camera
than sensor but just funny how things work out.

Kenneth Mahar says:

Hi Everyone

Full frame and Crop sensor cameras – there are benefits to both – but which
is right for you? I’m not going into the maths of this because many have
done it beautifully already. Instead I’m going to take some images on each
and explain the costs and payoffs of each.

I’m sorry it’s been a few weeks since the last video – I’ve been working
overseas and haven’t had time (or fast enough connection) to get one out to
you…

Best wishes

Mike

Giuseppe Pipia says:

False on the DOF: smaller sensors actually give you smaller DOF. If you
don’t believe me just try yourself on any online DOF calculator. Here’s an
example: given a 50mm lens, with an aperture of f/1.8, and the subject
being at 1 meter from the sensor plane, with a crop camera body you get
0.03m of DOF or 3cm or just above 1 inch of DOF. Having the same settings,
but switching to a FF camera you get 0.04m or 4cm or little less than 2
inches of DOF. Same goes with other aperture. For example with f/1.4 you
get 0.03m on FF and 0.02 on a cropped sensor body.

fred ligtvoet says:

Ilove Bokeh:) or DOF

Paul F says:

I find there are benefits to both crop and full frame. For me it depends on
what I’m photographing and is it for me or someone else, is it for web or
print. I still shoot older crop frames; Nikon D200 with a 28-85mm
f/3.5-4.5D and a 70-210mm 4.0-5.6D and the D5000 with an 17-55mm G, a
70-300 VR G and a Sigma 10-20mm. But if you’re paying me I use a D3 with a
12-24 f:2.8, 24-70 f:2.8 and 70-200 f:2.8.

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