Perfect vs Good Enough Photography

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What camera stuff I recommend, http://astore.amazon.co.uk/dombowerphoto-21 Getting There With Photography: By Dom Bower http://www.blurb.com/bookstore/detail…

Comments

Maxsdiscos says:

You are there to do a job. If the image is satisfactory, that is what
counts to the customer. I fully agree with the clothing not affecting your
quality of work.

Eric Rossi says:

Great vid. But my main question is, “is there EVER a such thing as a
perfect image?”

Robert Herrera says:

Can’t remember the photographer’s name, but I think you mentioned his work
before and was featured on Fstoppers before.. property photographer that
shoots composites / multiple exposures.

From what I gather.. he shoots one or two high end properties at a time. So
I’m guessing he has the time and budget to invest in that process and
development.

+Dombowerphoto If given the option to shoot 100 properties and produce
“good enough” photos or shoot 3 properties but are expected to produce
“near perfect” images, which would you choose. Assuming same time table and
budget.

Thanks… uhmm.. Cheers.

matthew Cardinal says:

If you get repeat business, you are good enough. And there is always
someone who is better, and there is always someone who cant teach you more
than you know. For me perfection is in the eye of the beholder.

Razor2048 says:

I think that user may have considered your photos to be beyond the level of
“good enough”. Doing multiple HDR images will make doing multiple homes per
day, very difficult. For HDR, there is no preset that can be used if you
want a consistent use. to maintain consistency, you pretty much have to do
your first image as good as possible, then throw it up on a second display,
and use that as a reference for the next image you do, and have those 2 on
the display. The only time when an HDR can be streamlined, is when the
lighting and environments remains the same, and the elements of the subject
remains the same, the moment one thing changes, then a preset will not work
well because the previous preset may not handle all of the colors the same
way.

Chris Song says:

the lint on your passenger seat is driving me nuts! you should take another
week and clone that out. lol but i guess that is “good enough” or
“more than good enough” for this application. awesome vid!

Tootightboxers says:

I agree, I went to Prague for 4 days last week and decided to leave the
DSLR at home so I could concentrate on having a good time and enjoying the
experience. I was a little gutted at first as the architecture over there
is stunning…. so I used my iPhone and a point & shoot to capture images.
When I got back I looked at them in lightroom and thought to myself I could
have done better with my full kit but you know what they’re pretty good….
and certainly ‘Good enough’ for holiday snaps/memories! To be totally fair
I actually got about 3 total gems with the iPhone that I would happily put
in a portfolio! 

Joonas Puuppo says:

Agreed. Instead of striving for perfection, we should strive for
“better-enough”.

Dombowerphoto says:
Robert Herrera says:

Hey +Dombowerphoto Just wanted to clarify some my previous comment on
which I’m guessing you based this video on.

There are a lot of people who put out horrible images and sell them off as
“good enough” to get the job done. When I said that you were not a “good
enough” photographer, I meant it as a compliment. I know that your standard
of good enough is at a much higher value. Sorry for the miss communication.

In response to your video, I totally agree. I too have to balance things
when it comes to my personal work (which I fight to get the perfect image)
to school portraits (I won’t spend too much time but the images are good
enough, but better than a cell phone pic). I get it.. stream line vs.
perfection.

Simon Hopkinson says:

In my world, “on time” is also subjective ;)

Gary Sanchez says:

I get your point but HDR, though it takes at least 3 times as long to
process, is worth it to me. But, that’s the key, it’s good enough for me. I
don’t use very many filters nor do I often use light modifiers, others feel
like they are slackers unless they use both. Each photographer, whether
they consider themselves artists or hired technician, can make those
decisions for themselves or have them made by their employer. Thanks for
starting the discussion. 

manuel ortiz says:

Something perfect is something you can measure. A perfect image is only
done by accomplishing a certain goal in the image, otherwise it’s all
subjective

Łukasz Grabski says:

That video was good enough for me :)

Christian Haubold says:

An economic term might work well here. It’s simply the “law of diminishing
returns”. 50% more effort does not necessarily mean 50% more return.
Basically “the gain is not worth the pain.”

Buddha Belly says:

6pack on your passenger seat? or 6pack themed lunchbox :P

Derek bell-jack says:

mixing business with pleasure?

marty smyth says:

Dom your an excellent photographer in my opinion keep up the good work

tomecin says:

Great video and I completely agree with your point. It comes down to cost v
benefit or time v profit. The question is, for your customer, which will
maximise your profit? Based on the product you need to deliver you have to
apportion your time and then your fee.

LandscapeArtist says:

I have a had friend who talks like the poodge smoocher Dom is talking
about. He is lonely and has no friends. Nuff said.

Spencer G says:

I was always taught in school about the TCQ triangle. There is Time, Cost
and Quality and they are all connected, for example, the more time and
money you are given, the higher the quality is and viseversa

jamieshill520 says:

People who have time to worry about getting it perfect are hobbyist most
likely. People who get the job done efficiently are professionals. 

Amy Neville says:

I agree – develop those skills for multiple exposures and so forth.

But don’t think you can do everything perfect all the time in photography.
These things should be there as a backup if you have some terribly harsh
lighting or something that your camera just cannot even produce a decent
image with.

Fall-back skills so to speak….

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